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Anyone out there? Service discovery with SSDP, WSD, other acronyms.

Those few regular readers of this stuff may remember What should we watch tonight, in which I used the Roku API to build a little web app to manage my TV watchlist. Since then I’ve found TV Time, which is waaay better and even tells me how many days until the next season of Cobrai Kai gets here (51 as of this writing). But what it doesn’t do is launch shows automatically on my TV, and yes I’m lazy enough to be annoyed by that. So I’ve been planning a companion app that will let me “share” shows directly to my Roku using the same API I used a few months ago.

This time, I’d like the app to auto-discover the TV, rather than asking the user to configure its IP address manually. Seems pretty basic — the Roku ECP API describes how it uses “Simple Service Discovery Protocol” to enable just that. But man, putting together a reliable implementation turned out to be a bear, and sent me tumbling down a rabbit hole of “service discovery” that was both fascinating and frankly a bit appalling.

Come with me down that rabbit hole, and let’s learn how those fancy home devices actually try to find each other. It’s nerd-tastic!

Can I get your number?

99% of what happens on networks is conversations between two devices that already know each other, either directly by address (like a phone number), or by a name that they use to look up an address (like using a phone book). And 99% of the time this works great — between “google.com” and QR codes and the bookmark lists we’ve all built up, there’s rarely any need to even think about addresses. But once in awhile — usually when you’re trying to set up a printer or some other smarty-pants device on your home network — things get a bit more complicated.

Devices on your network are assigned a (basically) arbitrary address by your wifi router, and they don’t have a name registered anywhere, so how do other devices find them to start a conversation? It turns out that there are a pile of different ways — most of which involve either multicast or broadcast UDP messaging, two similar techniques that enable a device to initiate a conversation without knowing exactly who it’s talking to. Vox Clamantis in Deserto as it were.

Side note: for this post I’m going to limit examples to IPv4 addressing, because it makes my job a little easier. The same concepts generally apply to IPv6, except that there is no true “broadcast” with v6 because they figured out that multicast could do all the same things more efficiently, but close enough.

An IP broadcast message is received by all devices on the local network that are listening on a given port. Typically these use the special “limited broadcast” address 255.255.255.255 (there’s also a “directed” broadcast address for each subnet which could theoretically be routed to other networks, but that’s more detail than matters for us). An IP multicast message is similar, but is received only by devices that have subscribed to (or joined) the multicast’s special “group” address. Multicast addresses all have 1110 as their most significant bits, which translates to addresses from 224.0.0.0 to 239.255.255.255.

Generally, these messages are restricted to your local network — that is, routers don’t send them out onto the wider Internet (there are exceptions for complex corporate-style networks, but whatever). This is a good thing, because the cacophony of the whole world getting all of these messages would most definitely take down the Internet. It’s also safer, as we’ll see a bit later.

Roku and SSDP

OK, back to the main thread here. Per the ECP documentation, Roku devices use Simple Service Discovery Protocol for discovery. SSDP defines a multicast address (239.255.255.250) and port (1900), a set of messages using what old folks like me still call RFC 822 format, and two interaction patterns for discovery:

  1. A client looking for devices sends a multicast M-SEARCH message with the type ssdp:discover, setting the ST header to either ssdp:all (everybody respond!) or a specific service type string (the primary Roku type is roku:ecp). AFAIK there is no authoritative list of ST values, you just kind of have to know what they are.  Devices listening for these requests respond directly to the client with a unicast HTTP OK response that includes (thank you) addressing information.
  2. Clients can also listen on the same multicast address for NOTIFY messages of type ssdp:alive or ssdp:byebye; devices send these out when they are turned on and off. It’s a good way to keep a list of devices accurate, but implementations are spotty so it really needs to be used in combination with #1.

An SSDP client in Java

Seems simple, right? I mean, OK, the basics really are simple. But a robust implementation runs into a ton of nit-picky little gotchas that, all together, took me days to sort out. The end result is on github and can be built/tested on any machine with java, git and maven installed (be sure to fix up slashes on Windows):

git clone https://github.com/seanno/shutdownhook.git
cd shutdownhook/toolbox
mvn clean package
java -cp target/toolbox-1.0-SNAPSHOT.jar \
    com.shutdownhook.toolbox.discovery.ServiceDiscovery \
    ssdp

This command line entrypoint just sends out an ssdp:discover message, displays information on all the devices that respond, and loops listening for additional notifications. Somebody on your network is almost sure to respond; in particular for Roku you can look for a line something like this:

+++ ALIVE: uuid:roku:ecp:2N006D062746 | roku:ecp | http://192.168.86.47:8060/ | (/192.168.86.47:1900)

Super cool! If you open up that URL in a browser you’ll see a bunch more detail about your Roku and the interfaces it supports.

Discovery Protocol Abuse

If you don’t see any responses at all, it’s likely that your firewall is blocking UDP messages either to or from port 1900 — my Linux Mint distribution does both by default. Mint uses UncomplicatedFirewall which means you can see blocking activity (as root) in /var/log/ufw.log and open up UDP port 1900 with commands like:

sudo ufw allow from any port 1900 to any proto udp
sudo ufw allow from any to any port 1900 proto udp

Before you do this, you should be aware that there is some potential for bad guys to do bad stuff — pretty unlikely, but still. Any protocol that can “amplify” one message into many (because multiple devices can respond) carries some risk of a denial-of-service attack. That can be very simple: a bad guy on your network just fires off a ton of M-SEARCH requests, prompting a flood of responses that overwhelm the network as a whole. Or it can be nastier: combined with “ip spoofing,” a bad guy can redirect amplified responses to an unsuspecting victim.

Really though, it’s pretty theoretical for a home network — routers don’t generally route these messages, so it’d have to be an inside job anyways. And once you’ve got a bad actor inside your network, they can probably do a lot more damage than just slowing it down. YMMV, but I’m not personally super-worried about this particular attack. Just please don’t confuse my blasé assessment here with the risks of the related Universal Plug-and-Play (UPnP) protocol, which are quite real.

Under the Covers

There is quite a bit to talk about in the code here. Most of the hard work is in UdpServiceDiscovery.java (I’ll explain this abstraction later), which uses two sockets and two worker threads:

Socket/Thread #1 (DISCOVERY) sends M-SEARCH requests and receives back HTTP OK responses. A request is sent when the thread first starts up and can be repeated either on demand or on a timer (by default every twenty minutes).

It’s key to understand that while the request here is a multicast message, the responses are sent back directly as a unicast. I didn’t implement the server side specifically, but you can see how this works in the automated tests — the responding device extracts the source address and port from the multicast and just replies with a standard UDP unicast message. This is important for us because only one process on a computer can actively listen for unicast messages on a port. And on many systems, somebody is probably already doing that on port 1900 (for example, the Windows service “SSDP Discovery”). So if we want to reliably hear HTTP OK responses, we need to be using an unused, automatically-assigned port for this socket.

Socket/Thread #2 (NOTIFICATION) is for receiving unsolicited NOTIFY multicasts. This socket uses joinGroup to register interest and must be opened on port 1900 to work correctly.

forEachUsefulInterface is an interesting little bit of code. It’s used both for sending requests and joining multicast groups, ensuring that the code works in a system that is connected to multiple network interfaces (typically not the case at home, but better safe than sorry). Remember that multicasts are restricted to a local network — so if you’re attached to multiple networks, you’ll need to send out one message on each of them. The realities of coordinating interfaces with addresses can get pretty complicated, but I think this gets it right. Let me know if you think I’ve missed something!

The class also tries to identify and ignore duplicate UDP messages. Dealing with dups just comes with the territory when working with UDP — and while the nature of the SSDP protocol means it generally doesn’t hurt anything to re-process them, it’s just icky. UdpServiceDiscovery tries to filter them out using message hashing and a FIFO queue of recently-received messages. You can tune this behavior (or turn it off) through config; default is a two-second lookback.  

Wait, is that Everyone? Enter WS-Discovery.

If you look closely you’ll see that UdpServiceDiscovery really isn’t specific to SSDP at all — all of the protocol-specific stuff is in Ssdp.java and transits through yet another class ServiceDiscovery.java. What the heck is going on here? The short story is that SSDP doesn’t return most printers, and Microsoft always needs to be special. The longer story requires a quick aside into the insanity that was “WS*”.

Back in 1999 and 2000, folks realized that HTTP would be great for APIs as well as web pages — and two very different approaches emerged. First by a few months was SOAP (and it’s fast-follower WSDL), which tried to be transport-independent (although 99.9% of traffic was over HTTP) and was all about defined, strongly typed interfaces. The foil to SOAP was REST — a much lighter and Internettish way to think about machine-to-machine interaction.

SOAP was big company, REST was scrappy startup. And nobody was more SOAPy than Microsoft. They had a whole group (I’m looking at you Bill, and your buddy John too) that did nothing but make up abstract, overly-complicated, insane SOAP-based “standards” informally known as “WS*” that nobody understood or needed. Seriously, just check out this poster (really, click that link, zoom in and scroll for awhile, it’s shocking). Spoiler alert: REST crushed it.

Anyways — one of these beasts was WS-Discovery, a protocol for finding devices on a network that does exactly the same thing as SSDP. Not “generally the same thing,” but exactly the same thing. The code that works for SSDP works for WSD too, just swap out the HTTP-style metadata for XML. Talk about reinventing the wheel, yeesh. But at least this explains the weird object hierarchy in my discovery classes:

Since these all use callback interfaces and sometimes you just want an answer, I added OneShotServiceDiscovery that wraps up Ssdp and Wsd like this (where “4” below is the number of seconds to wait for UDP responses to come in):

Set<ServiceInfo> infosSSD = OneShotServiceDiscovery.ssdp(4);
Set<ServiceInfo> infosWSD = OneShotServiceDiscovery.wsd(4);

There’s an entrypoint for this too, so to get a WSD device list you can use (the example is my Epson ET-3760):

java -cp target/toolbox-1.0-SNAPSHOT.jar \
    com.shutdownhook.toolbox.discovery.OneShotServiceDiscovery \
    wsd
...
urn:uuid:cfe92100-67c4-11d4-a45f-e0bb9e278967 | wsdp:Device wscn:ScanDeviceType wprt:PrintDeviceType | http://192.168.5.228:80/WSD/DEVICE | (/192.168.5.228:3702)

Actually, a full WSD implementation is more complicated than this. The protocol defines a “discovery proxy” — a device on the network that can cache device information and reduce network traffic. A proxy advertises itself by sending out HELLO messages with type d:DiscoveryProxy; clients are supposed to switch over to use this service when it’s present. So so much complexity for so so little benefit. No thanks.

Don’t forget the broadcast bunch

And we’re still not done. SSDP and WSD cover a bunch of devices and services, but they still miss a lot. Most of these use some sort of custom broadcast approach. If you poke around in UdpServiceDiscovery you’ll find a few special case bits to handle the broadcast case — we disable the NOTIFICATION thread altogether, and just use the DISCOVERY thread/socket to send out pings and listen for responses. The Misc class provides an entrypoint for this; you can find my Roomba using broadcast port 5678 like this:

java -cp target/toolbox-1.0-SNAPSHOT.jar \
    com.shutdownhook.toolbox.discovery.Misc \
    255.255.255.255 5678 irobotmcs
...
============ /192.168.4.48:5678
{"ver":"3","hostname":"Roomba-3193C60472324700","robotname":"Bellvoomba","ip":"192.168.4.48","mac":"80:91:33:9D:E2:16","sw":"v2.4.16-126","sku":"R960020","nc":0,"proto":"mqtt","cap":{"pose":1,"ota":2,"multiPass":2,"pp":1,"binFullDetect":1,"langOta":1,"maps":1,"edge":1,"eco":1,"svcConf":1}}

Sometimes you don’t even need a ping. For example, devices that use thes Tuya platform just sit there and constantly broadcast their presence on port 6666 or 6667:

java -cp target/toolbox-1.0-SNAPSHOT.jar \
    com.shutdownhook.toolbox.discovery.Misc \
    255.255.255.255 6667 tuya
...
============ / 192.168.5.253:60913
????1r???8?W??⌂???▲????H??? _???r?9???3?o*?jwz#?$?Z?H?¶?Q??9??r~  ?U

OK, that’s not super useful — it’s my smart ceiling fan, but apparently not all of their devices broadcast on 6666, and the messages on port 6667 are encrypted (using a global key, duh — this code shows how to decrypt them). This kind of thing annoys me because it doesn’t really secure anything and just makes life harder for everyone. I’m going to register my protest by not writing that code myself; that’ll show them.

In any case, you get the point — there are a lot of ways that devices try to make themselves discoverable. I’ve even seen code that just fully scans the network — mini wardialers that check every possible address for specific open ports (an approach that won’t survive the eventual v4-v6 address transition!). It’d be nice if this was more standardized, but I’m happy to live with a little chaos in return for the innovations that pop up every day. It’ll settle out eventually. Maybe.

Now back to that Roku app, which will use something like 5% of the code I wrote for this post. Just one of the reasons I’m a fan of retirement — I can burn cycles on any rabbit hole I damn well please. Getting the code right can be tricky, so perhaps it’ll prove useful to some other nerd out there. And as always, please let me know if you find a bug!

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